Shooting Street with Kodak Gold 200 ~ Carsland

        I keep coming back to Kodak Gold 200 for a number of reasons. Reason 1 is the price. In Canada I can purchase a 24 exposure 3 pack from Walmart for only $12.99, that’s only $4.33 a roll or 18 cents a frame. Now that’s cheap. Reason number 2 is it’s unique look that tends to favour warm tones even in mid-day light. These shot’s were taken on a Pentax PC35-AFM point and shoot camera, a true thrift store gem.  

Scene from Radiator Springs in Carsland.  

Scene from Radiator Springs in Carsland.  

The Cozy Cone

The Cozy Cone

A Weary Dad

A Weary Dad

No Xpan? No Problem

                  If there was ever a white whale camera that I would love to have in my film photography arsenal it would be the Hasselblad XPAN. The XPAN is a very unique camera that gives the photographer the ability to shoot wide cinematic scenes on 35mm film. The problem with wanting a one trick pony camera like the XPAN is that it is extreamly expensive and can sell for up to $5000 dollars on the used market. 5K is far beyond my thrift store budget so instead I am using an 80+ year old Zeiss Icon icarette 6x9 camera. The 6x9 format lends itself well to shooting 35mm panoramas but the only challenge is how do you load 35mm film in a 120 medium format camera. This problem is quite easily solved with a 35mm to 120 adapter and take up spool. These can pretty readily found on eBay or if your fortunate enough to have a 3D printer at home you can quickly print one up and start shooting. Fortunately a second side hobby of mine is 3D printing so I did just that.  

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Loading 35mm with the 3D printed adapters

Loading 35mm with the 3D printed adapters

                   Loading and shooting 35mm film on an old folding camera like this is really pretty simple. The first thing I did was start with a dummy roll of film to help determine how far to wind each frame. Without frame counters you need to be a bit creative so I decided to place a piece of tape at the beginning of my frame and count how many full turns it took to advance to the next frame. In my case it took 3 and a bit turns, OK it’s not an exact science. Once I was able to determine the right distance to advance each frame I loaded a roll of TriX 400 and drove down to the Harbor where I often go to find inspiration. Below are 5 of the 10 frames I shot. I was actually blown away at the sharpness the lens on this old folder was able to produce. The one tip I would give is to make sure that your frames are level and a tripod is very helpful tool for this. I hope you enjoy the images below and feel free to let me know what you think in the comments section below. 

Carl Zeiss Jenna Lens

Carl Zeiss Jenna Lens

Extended Bellows

Extended Bellows

Nanaimo Harbor, full in winter.  

Nanaimo Harbor, full in winter.  

Harbor strolling is definitely a Nanaimo past time.  

Harbor strolling is definitely a Nanaimo past time.  

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Accidental double exposure, but I kinda like it.  

Rare snowfall lining the docks edge.  

Rare snowfall lining the docks edge.  

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Weathered sailboat bow.  

       All images scanned on the Epson V600.  

Embracing “CRAP” Photography

               Let’s face it nobody cares about your photography except for you, so why do we bother? The things we incessantly ask ourselves are questions like, is the composition right, is my exposure accurate, is it sharp enough, will it move people, does it tell a story and countless other things that paralyze us from simply just being creative. This is precisely why the cult following of Lomography is so popular.  Avid Lomographers could care less about the questions above and would rather enjoy the spontaneity of just simply shooting. They enjoy things like blur and light leaks or scratches and grain, in fact they are really the band of misfits that push back against what the main stream says in aesthetically pleasing. This is all well and good but I don’t think I would consider myself one of these misfits however I did thouroughly enjoy creating these images. The point of the LOMO process is to just simply shoot and enjoy. This is what precisely happened. I could see myself doing this again and again. It’s just simply fun.  All of the images below were shot Lomography Color 400 120 film with the Diana F+ camera and home processed with the unicolour c-41 kit. Let me know what it is that you love about this process. 

Fuji Superia 400 ~ The Canadian Drug Store Film

             When it comes to shooting film I would more often be drawn to professional films like Portra or  Ektar but they are not always the best when you just want to shoot for the sake of shooting.  Sunny days during the winter on Vancouver Island are far and few between so my wife and I took some time to wander though Rathtrevor Park just outside of Parksville. Below are just a few of the images I shot.  What is your favourite drug store variety film, or does your drug store even carry film any longer? 

The Portra Pallet

        Each and every film emulsion is unique, exhibiting characteristics that make them easily distinguishable. Kodak Portra is no exception. One of the characteristics that keeps Portra shooters coming back for more are the bright soft muted tones. Below is an image that displays just that. The image was captured mid day on my Yashica Mat 124G TLR at f8 & 1/250 of a second. 

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Shooting Portra 400 on the Minolta AF2

                Testing out a camera with Portra 400 is expensive and therefor a tad bit risky. At over $10 per roll at most available locations it’s a hard roll to waste. Fortunately though this little beauty worked just fine. I shot it all at about a half stop over exposed and as expected Portra shined. As one of the most forgiving films out there Portra has up to 8 stops of latitude. That makes shooting this stuff a breeze.

                A quick word regarding the Minolta AF. This camera was super simple to use, your only option to manipulate your exposure is to adjust the ISO dial. This little Rangefider camera is also auto focus which some might find to be a great feature. I actually find it a bit boring to shoot with. The shutter sound is wimpy and the over all feel is very Plasticky.  I guess one can’t complain for only $15 bucks. I think I will go back to my compact SLR’s (the Pentax ME and the Canon AE1). What you can’t argue about on this camera is it’s image quality. When it locks it’s focus the results are actually pretty decent. See for yourself below and feel free to reach out and let me know what you think of this Camera and remember whoever you are and wherever you are keep shooting. 

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Shooting Expired Kodak Ektar 25~ Qualicum Beach

          Each and every time I load and shoot a roll of Kodak Ektar film I am blown away by 3 things. First is the incredible colors that Ektar produces. Second is the ability to produce amazing detail with incredible latitude. Third is the grain, Kodak claims that Ektar is the worlds finest grain film and I have to agree.  The images that I am sharing below are from this years Father’s Day car show in Qualicum Beach British Columbia. The only downside to Ektar in the price. In Canada we pay almost $11 dollars per roll (often plus shipping). If you gave me the choice between Ektar and Portra, i’d Have to choose Ektar. I would love to hear below what your favourite C-41 color film is. 

My new Range”FIND”er “

         The most enticing thing for me when it comes to thrift stores is the hunt for the unknown. It’s kind of like panning for gold I guess. Below is my latest treasure. This morning I loaded a roll of Kodak Portra 400 in my new Minolta Hi-Matic AF2 and drove down to one of my favourite spots in Nanaimo, Departure Bay Beach. Stay tuned in the weeks to come the results. 

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