First Roll… Canon 7 Range Finder.

Like always it’s exciting to get out and shoot a new film camera regardless of what format it is. The Canon 7 was my first attempt at shooting film on a true rangefinder. The Canon 7 is an LTM camera that is built with some decent heft and a level of quality that one could expect from a Japanese Camera of this era. Originally I wanted to buy a Canon 50mm 1.4 LTM to go along with this body but my budget decided otherwise. Instead I ended up with the Industar 61 which is a 53mm f2.8 made in Russia. My choice of film was Kodak Gold 200 and all the images were scanned by the Epson V600 and tweaked in Lightroom for the iPad. Below are a Few of the images I shot.

Shooting Street with Kodak Gold 200 ~ Carsland

        I keep coming back to Kodak Gold 200 for a number of reasons. Reason 1 is the price. In Canada I can purchase a 24 exposure 3 pack from Walmart for only $12.99, that’s only $4.33 a roll or 18 cents a frame. Now that’s cheap. Reason number 2 is it’s unique look that tends to favour warm tones even in mid-day light. These shot’s were taken on a Pentax PC35-AFM point and shoot camera, a true thrift store gem.  

Scene from Radiator Springs in Carsland.  

Scene from Radiator Springs in Carsland.  

The Cozy Cone

The Cozy Cone

A Weary Dad

A Weary Dad

Disneyland Kodak Gold 200


            The journey of learning analog photography can sometimes be a frustrating one. You see the work that others can create using the same film stock and you wonder how their final results are so amazing.  One of these days I am going to bite the bullet and get my 35mm film professionally scanned so that I can see if the results are that much more superior to what I am experiencing with my Epson V600. Below are a few frames from our last holiday to Disneyland's magic kingdom. I shot these images on Kodaks consumer grade Gold 200 film with the Pentax PC35AF-M point and shoot. 

Shooting Kodak Gold 200


        Canada day, the Canon A-E1 and Kodak Gold 200. A combo of consumer gear and consumer film. Each roll I shoot and review I am amazed at the ability of film to handle highlights. I used the Epson V600 to scan this roll and as I have read from others this scanner has a bit of trouble with 35mm film leaving a significant amount of noise (Not Grain) in the digital files. These scans are totally acceptable for the web but if I were to take them to print I would definitely have them professionally scanned. Kodak Gold is a great casual shooting film with fairly fine grain and decent daylight colors, I'm going to call it the poor man's PORTRA. Take a look at the images below and leave your comments below I would love to hear from you.